Heading off to VMworld US 2018

As I’m readying myself to board the plane that will take me to Las Vegas, I can’t help but feel excited to be heading back to VMworld US. Las Vegas is not everyone’s cup of tea, and maybe it’s just the geek in me, but Vegas feels like it has a certain electricity to it, that energizes me. VMworld has always been special for me, and I have been fortunate to attend these past three years. I’m always excited to meet new additions to the #vCommunity, along with seeing friends I’ve made in the community already. This is certainly a great bunch of geeks that continue to inspire me. I can’t wait to see what VMware has in store for attendees, with product releases and announcements.

VMware Education Services has updated the naming conventions of VMware’s professional certifications

FYI – VMware is making some major changes to their certification naming conventions. Changes take affect August 2018 for newly released certifications listed below, and are not retroactive.  This will not affect the naming of existing certifications however.

  • VMware Certified Professional – Desktop and Mobility 2018 (VCP-DTM 2018)
  • VMware Certified Advanced Professional – Data Center Virtualization Deployment (VCAP-DCV 2018 Deployment)
  • VMware Certified Advanced Professional – Cloud Management and Automation Deployment (VCAP-CMA 2018 Deployment)

Read more on their official blog post here:

https://blogs.vmware.com/education/2018/08/22/we-are-changing-the-way-we-name-vmware-certifications-the-year-makes-it-clear/

NSX SSL Certificate Failure on ESXi: SSL handshake failed

Some time ago I was having an issue putting a host back into service in an NSX environment.  In Log Insight, and in the /var/log/netcpa.log I was seeing errors similar to the following:

2018-05-26T11:07:50.486Z [FFD53B70 error 'Default'] SSL handshake failed on 172.15.4.100:0 : error = SSL Exception: error:140000DB:SSL routines:SSL routines:short read
2018-05-26T11:07:55.545Z [FFD12B70 error 'Default'] SSL handshake failed on 172.15.4.100:0 : error = SSL Exception: error:140000DB:SSL routines:SSL routines:short read
2018-05-26T11:08:00.600Z [FFD12B70 error 'Default'] SSL handshake failed on 172.15.4.100:0 : error = SSL Exception: error:140000DB:SSL routines:SSL routines:short read

Browsing through VMware’s archive, I came across KB2151089, very similar to the issue I was having, however upgrading to NSX 6.3.5 was not an option at the time.  I remembered a similar issue at my previous workplace, and dug through my evernote archive to find my notes.

Before we continue, this should go without saying, but your milage may very, and I’d recommend opening a ticket with VMware’s GSS.  At the very least you should test this process out in a lab.

These steps outlined here will resolve the issue.  Keep in mind at this point, the host is not in production, and currently is in maintenance mode:

  • Determine if the NSX controllers are connected by logging into the ESXi host, and running the following commands:
# esxcli network ip connection list |grep 1234

— and —

# esxcli network ip connection list |grep 5671

 

  • Next, log into the NSX appliance and backup the config.  While the config backup is taking place, get the ESXi host mob id from the vCenter mob page https://<vcsa-fqdn>/mob
  1. select the link for the ‘root folder‘, eg. group-d1
  2. select the link for the ‘child entity‘ eg. datacenter-2
  3. select the link for the ‘host folder‘ eg. group-h4
  4. select the link for the ‘child entity‘ eg. domain-c7
  5. Now locate the ‘host‘ and find the host-xxxx value. eg: host-1234 
  • After the NSX backup is complete, ssh into the NSX manager.  Root access to the appliance will be needed, so at the command prompt:
  1. Enter ‘en‘ and the enter the ‘admin’ password
  2. Enter ‘st en‘ and enter the following password: IAmOnThePhoneWithTechSupport 
  • Log into the sql prompt
# psql -U secureall
secureall=#
  • Issue the following command to verify that there is a record associated with the host mob ID.  Below is an example using host-1234
# select host_uuid,node_uuid,thumbprint from vnvp_hot_key where host_uuid='host-1234';

Example output:

host_uuid  |              node_uuid               | thumbprint                      
-----------+--------------------------------------+------------------
host-1234  | a2a68660-515e-4f87-811d-306c54b0b2e8 |AD:58:C0:84:FF:DF: 5E:95:50:B7:63:2E:3F:B2:67:22:56:F7:DC:9B

(1 row)

  • Next, in vCenter move the host to an isolation cluster.  We will need to validate the NSX vibs installed by running the following command on the host:
# esxcli software vib list |grep -E 'esx-dvfilter-switch-security|vsip|vxlan'

 

Example output:

esx-dvfilter-switch-security   6.3.1-0.0.5124716  VMware  VMwareCertified 2017-02-28
esx-vsip                       6.3.1-0.0.5124716  VMware                VMwareCertified 2017-02-28

esx-vxlan                      6.3.1-0.0.5124716  VMware VMwareCertified 2017-02-28

 

  • Remove the NSX vibs with the following commands:
# esxcli software vib remove -n esx-vxlan
# esxcli software vib remove -n esx-vsip
# esxcli software vib remove -n esx-dvfilter-switch-security

 

  • Returning to the NSX terminal window, now delete the record using the secureall=# prompt. Using ‘host-1234’ as an example.
# delete from vnvp_host_key where host_uuid='host-1234';
DELETE 1

 

  • Reboot the ESXi host.  Once the host has rebooted, put the host back into the proper cluster.  To be safe, I would temporarily turn down DRS (move slider left), and exit maintenance mode.
  • We can validate that the host looks proper in vSphere web UI: ‘Network & Security -> Installation -> Host Preparation Tab‘ .
  • Click the ‘Resolve‘ link next to the cluster name

Validation

  • Once the tasks are all completed you can run the ‘esxcli software vib list….‘ command again to see that the three vibs have been installed.
  • Test that the vxlan network is functioning on the host.
  • Verify that the SSL Exception is no longer showing in the /var/log/netcpa.log.
  • If there are no errors, then the host is all set to be put back into service.

 

 

 

VMworld 2018 is right around the corner! Where will you be?

It’s almost that time a year again….some might even call it that special time of year where VMware geeks from across the globe converge on VMworld.  One might even consider this summer camp, and like any who have experienced this before, you meet new people in the vCommunity, make friends, and part ways after the week of technical sessions, social gatherings, and just the straight up shop talking, war story sharing, and the sharing of ideas.  Personally, this will be my third year attending, and I am super excited to be going.  This conference means enough to me that, due to other circumstances that happened early this year, I purchased my own pass so to ensure that I wouldn’t miss out.

Now is the perfect time to cash in on those early bird discounts on conference passes, good until June 15.  Why wouldn’t you want to save a couple hundred dollars on one of the best IT conferences of the year?  For an individual, it’s $1,795 vs $2,095.  That’s before other discounts that may be applied like vmug memberships, or the discount for VMware Certified Professionals who hold an active VCP.

So, why go to VMworld?

I think for many first timers, there’s a certain electricity, and excitement about going.  Let me be the first to tell you, that feeling…. never really goes away.  Like the past couple of years, VMworld in the US will be held once again in Las Vegas.

Image result for VMworld 2018

I personally love coming to VMworld and have looked forward to it every year.  There’s always good energy here; the minute you get off the plane, it is happy.  Every experience I’ve had here is fun, and people genuinely are in a good mood.  This conference gives attendees the chance to attend VMware lead, and partner lead sessions on platforms you may have thought about using or are currently using.  These sessions are meant to share best practices with the community, transfer knowledge in ways to use VMware platforms, and also give you a chance to ask the experts, many of whom work for VMware, and in some cases, are very involved with the development of the platforms you use.

VMworld is not just about attending sessions however.  This conference gives you the unique opportunity to network with other IT professionals from across the globe and establish relationships that you would otherwise never be able to do.  Like it did for me, this conference may also inspire you to join the vCommunity, a thriving community of professionals who not only share their knowledge with others, but who also need help themselves.  I think we can all agree that no two environments/businesses are alike, and we have all used VMware’s platforms in ways that were intended, and in ways that even VMware might not have ever considered.  Members of the vCommunity take it upon themselves to share their experiences with others, through blogs, social media, and support forums to help others.  This conference gives us a chance to get together, share war stories from our time in the trenches, and many times, you will find attendees getting together to engineer and develop something cool.

VMware {code} group has even put together a hackathon, where members from the vCommunity can get together while at VMworld, to develop some amazing things, and sometimes there are even prizes to be had for the coolest of the cool ideas.  But don’t let those words “code” or “hackathon” scare you.  These sessions are not just for developers!  Sure it will certainly help, but the power of the community, enables you to participate in these teams anyways.  You may not be able to contribute code, but you can still contribute ideas to the team, and you might even pick up a few coding skills in the fun.  Let’s face it; some pretty cool ideas are cooked up during hackathons.  VMware’s internal hackathon cooked up the idea to bring VR into the datacenter, and allow you to virtually move your workloads from On-Premises Data Centers, into the cloud.  It’s freakin VR man!  How cool is that?

Screenshot2

The VMworld conference also affords you the opportunity to attend instructor lead labs, along with VMware’s hands on labs that you can also experience from home.  While at the conference, there will be many vendors out on the floor where you can experience new products, ask questions about products that you already use, and lets not forget the vendor haul crawl where there will be free adult beverages, snacks, and cool swag vendors are giving out.  All can be found in the solutions exchange area.

Image result for VMworld 2017

I’m not going to lie, the parties at VMworld are pretty wild too.  Not saying that should be the only reason you go, but it is a good way to mingle with other conference attendees, jam out to some good music, and of course escape the Las Vegas heat.  VMworld of course wraps up with it’s own party, before the last day of the conference.

Screen Shot 2018-06-02 at 12.16.46 PM

So what are you waiting for?  I can’t think of any reason not to attend the US 2018 VMworld in Las Vegas, August 26th – 30th, or the UK 2018 VMworld in Barcelona, November 5th – 8th.  Follow this link here, and I will see you at the conference in Las Vegas!  Remember to take advantage of those early bird rates, good until June 15th!  REGISTER HERE FOR VMWORLD 2018

Screen Shot 2018-06-03 at 9.29.50 AM

 

Simple, Efficient, and Modern: VMware NSX…

Simple, Efficient, and Modern: VMware NSX introduces new HTML5 UI

Simple, Efficient, and Modern: VMware NSX…

Along with the advancements in context-aware micro-segmentation and network virtualization, we are also continually raising the bar on making VMware NSX simple to deploy, manage, and operationalize at scale – and that, of course, involves a responsive and easy-to-use HTML-based UI to access VMware NSX functionality. With VMware NSX for vSphere 6.4.1, you can now The post Simple, Efficient, and Modern: VMware NSX introduces new HTML5 UI appeared first on Network Virtualization .


VMware Social Media Advocacy

Add Custom Recommendation to vROps alert definition for versions prior to 6.6

  • This is useful when a new SOP document is created, we will be able to link to it directly on the alert email that is sent.

Step-By-Step

  1. Log into the main vRealize Operations Manager page.
  2. Click Content and then Recommendations

  3. On this page you can create, edit and delete custom recommendations.  Click the green plus sign to create a new custom recommendation.
  4. Here you can enter the test for the custom recommendation.  Paste the link to the SOP, highlight it, and then click the hyperlink icon.  Now paste the link again and click OK.  The “actions” section will allow the use of automated functions if you were looking at the triggered alert in vROps.  For now, just click save.
  5. Now you can add the custom recommendation to an alert definition.  Click Content and then Alert Definitions.
  6. Search for the alert that you would like to add the SOP to, select it and click the edit button.
  7. Click on section 5: Add Recommendations and then click on the plus sign
  8. Now you will need to search for the new SOP recommendation you just created, so search for SOP, find it in the list on the left, click and drag to position under the Recommendations section.
  9. Finally click save.  Now when this alert is triggered, and an email is sent, there will be a clickable link in the email to the SOP document.

With a new role, a new adventure awaits.

I am excited to share that as of today, I have accepted a position with Rackspace, as a VMware product engineer.

In this new role, I will take my hands on experience as a VMware Cloud Engineer, and apply it towards this new role, getting deeper into the designing, testing and documenting systems architecture, and getting to work with the latest technologies in the cloud space.   I fully expect new blog posts in the future to revolve more around VMware based cloud solutions, and I cannot wait to get started.  I appreciate those of you who visit my blog site, and I will be back with more technology blogs in the coming months.  I also plan to purchase another node for my Home Lab, so that I can have true hosts supporting my environment.  Nested is fun, but nothing beats the power of a dedicated host.  Stay tuned!

Traveling. First vmug Usercon in Denver Colorado.

In my quest for finding a new role in Colorado, I decided to travel there for the vmug (VMware User Group) Denver usercon last week.

As this was my first ever VMUG, I don’t really have anything to compare it to other than a pocket sized VMworld. Some pretty cool sessions by the community, for the community.

Checked out as many sessions as I could, but quickly found that VMware lead sessions and community lead sessions were happening at the same time. I did manage to catch Jase McCarty’s session on VSAN.

Met up with my good friend and community leader while at the Denver UserCon: Ariel Sanchez Mora.

Ariel gave a pretty dope presentation on automating vSphere with Ansible for beginners, and really broke it down to the basics to help people take their first steps. (photo credit: @joeypiccola)

Afterwards we got together with other folks for Denver vbeers at this killer German inspired pub called Rhein Haus over on Market Street.

Shout-out to @jasemccarty and @AntonNApril and others for putting together a killer vbeers, and a special shout-out to Rhein Haus, for their friendly staff, and killer German inspired food. This place was on point, and it will certainly be on my list for places to eat when I am out that way again.

I met these awesome people while attending #DVVMUG; what an amazing community! Don’t tell Ariel but I stole some of his photos from the event:) Twitter shout-outs: @vMollyHewitt @MaginMills @mattheldstab @AlexDanMorales @avila_la @thatvirtualboy @seanbwhitney @vGonzilla @vMbanusi @JonOnDaCloud @AntonNApril @RebeccaFitzhugh @jasemccarty @vScottSeifert

Afterwards the mass of community geeks departed vbeers, Ariel, myself and Jon Harris checked out this cool dinner called Sam’s No. 3 over on Curtis Street to talk shop, and eat some great food. I’ll spare you the food pics, as you’ll just have to experience the place for yourself 🙂

Ariel and I got together the next morning for some breakfast. Side note, if Ariel ever asks if you’re afraid of heights, it’s a trap! All kidding aside this was a pretty cool atrium shot.

Afterword, Ariel and I hit the road to travel North to Fort Collins Colorado, where I spent the weekend with a good friend of mine.

I can’t say it enough about what a boss Ariel was that day. I had only expected him to take me to the Denver airport so that I could catch the bus to Fort Collins, but this dude just drove me up there himself. That’s the vCommunity in action right there.

Before Ariel and I parted ways, he showed me one of his favorite restaurants in the area, where we got lunch. I’ll finish the post up with some other photos I took that weekend.