NSX-T 2.4 debut and new UI demo from #NFD20

NSX-T 2.4 debut and new UI demo from #NFD20

This Presentation date is February 14, 2019 at 15:00-18:00 local time. Presenters: Dimitri Desmidt, Fan Gu, Ganapathi Bhat, Jaspreet Bhatia, Pooja Patel, Tim Van Herck, Tom Gillis, Tony Banuelos Tom Gillis, VMware SVP and GM of networking and security discusses his views on the future of networking and what’s driving VMware NSX adoption. Networking complexity is holding customers back. Networking must be as simple as it is in AWS or Azure. VMware NSX is delivering automated, secure, software-defined network infrastructure as code, operating at cloud-scale, with single-click deployment to wherever apps are located. The session will provide insight into VMware’s analytics partners that can ingest and visualize NetFlow IPFIX data as well as…Read More


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Introducing NSX-T 2.4 – A Landmark Release in…

Introducing NSX-T 2.4 – A Landmark Release in the History of NSX

Introducing NSX-T 2.4 – A Landmark Release in…

In February 2017, we introduced VMware NSX-T Data Center to the world. For years, VMware NSX for vSphere had been spearheading a network transformation journey with a software-defined, application-first approach. In the meantime, as the application landscape was changing with the arrival of public clouds and containers, NSX-T was being designed to address the evolving The post Introducing NSX-T 2.4 – A Landmark Release in the History of NSX appeared first on Network Virtualization.


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New KB articles published for the week ending…

New KB articles published for the week ending 9th February,2019

New KB articles published for the week ending…

VMware vSphere ESXi Storage Center systems with Front End SAS connectivity show lun capacity 0MB Date Published: 2/5/2019 VMware Horizon Installation of Horizon View Agent 7.7 or newer on Windows 2008 R2 Server may fail Date Published: 2/5/2019 Issues when Horizon View Connection Server / Security Server when deployed with dissimilar FIPS mode configurations Date The post New KB articles published for the week ending 9th February,2019 appeared first on VMware Support Insider.


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New KB articles published for the week ending…

New KB articles published for the week ending 9th February,2019

New KB articles published for the week ending…

VMware vSphere ESXi Storage Center systems with Front End SAS connectivity show lun capacity 0MB Date Published: 2/5/2019 VMware Horizon Installation of Horizon View Agent 7.7 or newer on Windows 2008 R2 Server may fail Date Published: 2/5/2019 Issues when Horizon View Connection Server / Security Server when deployed with dissimilar FIPS mode configurations Date The post New KB articles published for the week ending 9th February,2019 appeared first on VMware Support Insider.


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VMware Certification: Recertification Is…

VMware Certification: Recertification Is Changing and What It Means to You

VMware Certification: Recertification Is…

Part of our goal as a certification program is to create policies that enable you to validate your expertise and show your relevancy in the industry. The recertification policy of a two-year upgrade was in place to help you maintain that relevancy through upgraded certifications and up-to-date skills. Recertification is important enough to create The post VMware Certification: Recertification Is Changing and What It Means to You appeared first on VMware Education Services.


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vRealize Operations Manager Dashboard: vSphere DRS Cluster Health. Part 2

This blog series assumes that the reader has some understanding of how to create a vRealize Operations Manager (vROps) dashboard.

vROps dashboards are made up of what is called widgets. These widgets can either be configured as “self providers”, or can be populated with data by a “parent” widget. Self provider widgets, are configured to individually show specific data. In other words, one widget shows hosts, another shows datastores, and another showing virtual machines, however the widgets will not interact, nor are they dependent of each other. Parent widgets, are configured to provide data from a specific source, and then feed it into other child widgets on the page. This is useful when data is desired to be displayed in different formats of consumption. The dashboard I configured called “vSphere DRS Cluster Health”, does just that. I will break the widgets down to different sections as I walk through the configuration.

Widget #1 – This widget is known as an “object list“, and will be the parent widget of this dashboard. In other words, widgets #2 through #6 rely on the data presented by widget #1. In this case I have the object list widget, configured to show/list the different host clusters in my homelab.

I have given it a title, set refresh content to ON, set the mode to PARENT, and have it set to auto select the first row. In the lower left section “Select which tags to filter”, I have created an environment group in vROps called “Cluster Compute Resource” where I have specified my host clusters. In the lower right box, I have a few metrics selected which I would also like this “object list” widget to show.

This is just a single esxi homelab, so this won’t look as grand as it would if it were to be configured for a production environment. But each object in this list is select-able, and the cool thing is that each object in this list, when it is selected, will change the other widgets.

Widgets #2 and #3 are called “health charts”. I have one configured with the metric for cluster CPU workload %, and the other configured with the metric cluster memory workload %. Both configurations are the same, with the exception that one has a custom metric of Cluster CPU Workload %, and the other is configured with the custom metric of Cluster Memory Workload %. I have both configured to show data for the past 24hrs.

Important: For these two widgets, under “widget interactions“, set both to the first widget: DRS Cluster Settings (Select a cluster to populate charts)

Widgets #4 and #5 are called “View widgets”. One is configured to show the current Cluster CPU Demand, and the other is configured to show the current Cluster Memory Demand. These are also configured to forecast out for 30 days, so that we can potentially see if the clusters will run short of capacity in the near future, allowing us the ability to add more compute to the cluster preemptively.

These are two custom “views” I created. I will go over how to create custom views in a future post, but for those who already know how, I have one “widget view” configured with each.

Important: For these two widgets, under “widget interactions“, set both to the first widget: ” DRS Cluster Settings (Select a cluster to populate charts) ” like we did above.

Widget #6 is another “Object List” widget, and I have this configured to show only host systems, of the selected cluster in Widget #1. Widget #6 will be used to provide data to Widgets #7 and #8.

I also have certain Host System metrics selected here so that I can get high level information of the hosts in the cluster.

Important: For these two widgets, under “widget interactions“, set both to the first widget: ” DRS Cluster Settings (Select a cluster to populate charts)” like we did above.

The final two widgets, #7 and #8, are also called “health chart” widgets. One is configured using the metric host system CPU workload %, and the other is configured using the metric host system Memory workload %. I have both configured to show data for the past 24hrs.

Important: For these two widgets, under “widget interactions“, set both to widget #6, in this example: Host Workload (select a host to populate charts to the right).